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Drums and dreams from Rwanda at IDFA

Yesterday’s premiere of the documentary ‘Sweet Dreams’ was celebrated with an exciting performance by three drummers of Prince Claus Fund partner Ingoma Nshya, Rwanda’s first and only female drumming group. After the performance, Christa Meindersma, director of the Prince Claus Fund, conducted a Q&A with the drummers and Rob Fruchtman, co-director of 'Sweet Dreams’.

'Sweet Dreams' tells the story of a group of Rwandan women that rediscover their love of life by drumming together. Today, Rwandan society is still deeply marked by the 1994 genocide, when ethnic violence between Hutus and Tutsis caused the deaths of more than a million people. The women of Ingoma Nsyha –orphans, widows and children of perpetrators– chose to leave the past behind and create a future together by playing the drums. But this is only the beginning of the story. ‘Sweet Dreams’ follows the drummers as they embark on an entirely different project: opening Rwanda’s first ice-cream shop. How will the women manage this new business, Inzozi Nziza or 'Sweet Dreams', and turn it into a success?

“I am so excited to share our story with the rest of the world” says Marthe Nyiranzeyimana, one of the founding members of Ingoma Nsyha. Clementine Uwamariya, another member of the group, reveals that, after sharing her story with filmmakers Rob and Lisa Fruchtman, she never believed she would actually see the film; other documentarians had interviewed her in the past without producing a finished product. With regard to 'Sweet Dreams', Clementine states that she is very happy with the final result. Rob Fruchtman emphasises how important it was to him and his sister, co-director Lisa Fruchtman, to complete the film after several years, and make sure that the stories of the women were told.

Prince Claus Fund partner Odile 'Kiki' Gakire Katese founded Ingoma Nshya in 2005 because of the connection she saw between art and healing. She contacted West-African drum teachers who taught members of Ingoma Nshya different rhythms and helped them develop their unique sound. In Rwanda and abroad Ingoma Nysha is now in high demand. Performing at a myriad of events nationally and internationally gives the women confidence in both themselves and in their country, in spite of its complicated past. Clementine Uwintije, another member of Ingoma Nshya, states, “My heart is not heavy like before, because of the happiness of drumming.”

Although some of the men in their communities laughed at the women at first, they have become very supportive of this group of hardworking and talented drummers. Marthe Nyiranzeyimana closed the Q&A by saying, “Women are developing, and the men want to be part of this development.”

'Sweet Dreams' will be shown two more times in Amsterdam at IDFA. 

'Sweet Dreams' Screenings

Tuesday 20 November 2012, 16.00 hrs
Melkweg Theaterzaal
Lijnbaansgracht 234, Amsterdam

Wednesday 21 November 2012, 13.00 hrs
Tuschinski 4
Reguliersbreestraat 26, Amsterdam

Drums and dreams from Rwanda at IDFA

"I am so excited to share our story with the rest of the world"

Marthe Nyiranzeyimana, founding member of Ingoma Nshya

Subventions & Collaborations

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Subventions & Collaborations

Drums and dreams from Rwanda at IDFA

 
 
 
 

Drums and dreams from Rwanda at IDFA

Yesterday’s premiere of the documentary ‘Sweet Dreams’ was celebrated with an exciting performance by three drummers of Prince Claus Fund partner Ingoma Nshya, Rwanda’s first and only female drumming group. After the performance, Christa Meindersma, director of the Prince Claus Fund, conducted a Q&A with the drummers and Rob Fruchtman, co-director of 'Sweet Dreams’. 'Sweet...